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'Wearable microgrid' uses the human body to sustainably power small gadgets

'Wearable microgrid' uses the human body to sustainably power small gadgets

March 9, 2021

This shirt harvests and stores energy from the human body to power small electronics. UC San Diego nanoengineers call it a "wearable microgrid"—it combines energy from the wearer's sweat and movement to provide renewable power for wearable devices. Full Story


New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor

New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor

February 15, 2021

UC San Diego engineers have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer’s levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It performs as well as commercial monitoring devices such as a blood pressure cuff, blood lactate meter, glucometer and breathalyzer.  Full Story


Making masks smarter and safer against COVID-19

Making masks smarter and safer against COVID-19

January 21, 2021

A new tool for monitoring COVID-19 may one day be right under your nose. Researchers at the University of California San Diego are developing a color-changing test strip that can be stuck on a mask and used to detect SARS-CoV-2 in a person’s breath or saliva. The project is aimed at providing simple, affordable and reliable surveillance for COVID-19 infections that can be done daily and easily implemented in resource-poor settings. Full Story


Wearables: Where Are We?

Wearables: Where Are We?

January 21, 2021

We spoke with Patrick Mercier,  professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and co-director of the Center for Wearable Sensors (CWS), and Joseph Wang, professor of Nanoengineering and director of CWS. Full Story


10 Jacobs School Faculty Named in 2020 List of Highly Cited Researchers

10 Jacobs School Faculty Named in 2020 List of Highly Cited Researchers

December 8, 2020

Ten professors at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering are among the world’s most influential researchers in their fields, according to a new research citation report from the Web of Science Group. The professors, Ludmil Alexandrov, Trey Ideker, Rob Knight, Nathan E. Lewis, Prashant Mali, Ying Shirley Meng, Bernhard O. Palsson, Joseph Wang, Kun Zhang and Liangfang Zhang, are amone 52 professors and researchers at UC San Diego named in the prestigious list of Highly Cited Researchers in 2020. Full Story


2021 Talanta Medal awarded to Professor Joseph Wang

2021 Talanta Medal awarded to Professor Joseph Wang

October 21, 2020

The Talanta Medal, awarded on a biennial basis, acknowledges outstanding achievements in analytical chemistry. The 2021 Medal is awarded to Professor Joseph Wang of the University of California San Diego, USA, in recognition of his many outstanding contributions to the field, especially in pioneering developments in electrochemistry, biosensors, nanomachines, wearable devices, nanobioelectronics, and analytical chemistry. Full Story


Wearable Electrochemical Sensors for the Monitoring and Screening of Drugs

Wearable Electrochemical Sensors for the Monitoring and Screening of Drugs

August 24, 2020

A new article in ACS Sensors from Joseph Wang's lab reviews for the first time wearable electrochemical sensors for monitoring therapeutic drugs and drugs of abuse. Full Story


Nanoengineering and chemical engineering at UC San Diego in the spotlight

Nanoengineering and chemical engineering at UC San Diego in the spotlight

August 10, 2020

A creative group of faculty, students and staff within the University of California San Diego are taking innovative approaches to develop breakthroughs in nanomedicine, flexible electronics, and energy storage. Together, this group makes up the Department of NanoEngineering and the Chemical Engineering Program at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. A virtual issue of the journal ACS Nano highlights the wide ranging research, educational and workforce-development contributions of this extraordinary group.  Full Story


New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability

New fabrication method brings single-crystal perovskite devices closer to viability

July 29, 2020

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego developed a new method to fabricate perovskites as single-crystal thin films, which are more efficient for use in solar cells and optical devices than the current state-of-the-art polycrystalline forms of the material. Researchers in Professor Sheng Xu’s lab published their findings on July 29 in Nature. Full Story


Wearable device company named Spinoff Prize finalist

Wearable device company named Spinoff Prize finalist

July 17, 2020

Softsonics, a UC San Diego spinoff company co-founded by and based on work from Nanoengineering Professor Sheng Xu, has been named a finalist for the inaugural Spinoff Prize from Nature. Softsonics is developing a soft, flexible patch that can be worn on the skin over the carotid artery or jugular vein, and which uses pulses of ultrasound to measure blood pressure. The hope is that the device will provide a deeper and more accurate measurement of blood pressure, both for people in intensive care and for those going about their daily lives. Full Story


IEEE Spectrum Cover Story

IEEE Spectrum Cover Story

June 22, 2020

The cover feature of IEEE Spectrum this month is a feature on the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors: Why Sweat will Power your next Wearable. Full Story


New wearable sensor tracks Vitamin C levels in sweat

New wearable sensor tracks Vitamin C levels in sweat

May 18, 2020

A team at the University of California San Diego has developed a wearable, non invasive Vitamin C sensor that could provide a new, highly personalized option for users to track their daily nutritional intake and dietary adherence. The study was published in the May 18, 2020 issue of ACS Sensors. Full Story


A low-power, low-cost wearable to monitor COVID-19 patients

A low-power, low-cost wearable to monitor COVID-19 patients

May 18, 2020

Engineers at the University of California San Diego are developing low-cost, low-power wearable sensors that can measure temperature and respiration--key vital signs used to monitor COVID-19. The devices would transmit data wirelessly to a smartphone, and could be used to monitor patients for viral infections that affect temperature and respiration in real time. The research team plans to develop a device and a manufacturing process in just 12 months.   Full Story


New chip brings ultra-low power Wi-Fi connectivity to IoT devices

New chip brings ultra-low power Wi-Fi connectivity to IoT devices

February 17, 2020

More portable, fully wireless smart home setups. Lower power wearables. Batteryless smart devices. These could all be made possible thanks to a new ultra-low power Wi-Fi radio developed by UC San Diego engineers. It enables Wi-Fi communication at 5,000 times less power than commercial Wi-Fi radios. Full Story


Five Outstanding Engineering Honor Awards to be Presented by the San Diego County Engineers Council

Five Outstanding Engineering Honor Awards to be Presented by the San Diego County Engineers Council

February 5, 2020

In its 69th year, the annual Engineers Week Awards Banquet, hosted by the San Diego County Engineering Council (SDCEC) on February 21, 2020, is bringing together leaders in our community to celebrate those who educate, create and advance engineering. The 2020 winners who will be receiving the prestigious SDCEC Engineering Honor Awards include Patrick Mercier, who will be receiving the Outstanding Engineer of the Year Award. Full Story


Growing strained crystals could improve performance of perovskite electronics

Growing strained crystals could improve performance of perovskite electronics

January 9, 2020

A new method could enable researchers to build more efficient, longer lasting perovskite solar cells and LEDs. By growing thin perovskite films on different substrates, UC San Diego engineers invented a way of fabricating perovskite single crystals with precisely deformed, or strained, structures. Full Story


New chip for waking up small wireless devices could extend battery life

New chip for waking up small wireless devices could extend battery life

November 12, 2019

A new power saving chip could significantly reduce or eliminate the need to replace batteries in Internet of Things (IoT) devices and wearables. The so-called wake-up receiver wakes up a device only when it needs to communicate and perform its function, saving on power use. Full Story


Pacifier embedded with biosensors monitors newborn glucose levels

Pacifier embedded with biosensors monitors newborn glucose levels

November 7, 2019

CWS researchers created a pacifier-based electrochemical biosensor that tracks real-time glucose levels in a baby's saliva. Until now, it has been difficult to use wearables with babies and infants. Biosensors are typically made with bulky and rigid surfaces that could be harmful to a baby's skin. Long term use of wearables could cause discomfort for babies that they cannot communicate. The new biosensor is created with soft, pacifier-like materials that are safe for babies. When an infant sucks on the pacifier, small amounts of saliva transfer through the channel to the integrated outside detection chamber. Full Story


Congressional hearing discusses CWS innovations

Congressional hearing discusses CWS innovations

November 7, 2019

At a recent Congressional hearing, the following question was posed: "If resources were available, what is the innovative research you would like to pursue?" One of the answers discussed continuous, wearable health trackers, such as the ultrasound patch for monitoring blood pressure developed by the lab of Sheng Xu. Full Story


Center for Wearable Sensors Fall 2019 Research Summit

Center for Wearable Sensors Fall 2019 Research Summit

October 23, 2019

The Center for Wearable Sensors hosted its Fall 2019 Research Summit on Oct. 23. UC San Diego faculty gave talks on their CWS projects, ranging from smart glasses for everyday health monitoring to minimally invasive microneedles for interstitial fluid monitoring. Full Story


Joseph Wang named among 2019 Class of ECS Fellows

Joseph Wang named among 2019 Class of ECS Fellows

September 9, 2019

Fellow of The Electrochemical Society was established in 1989 for advanced individual technological contributions in the fields of electrochemistry and solid state science and technology and service to the Society. These members are being recognized at the plenary session for scientific achievements, for leadership, and for active participation in the affairs of ECS. Each year, up to 15 renowned scientists and engineers are chosen by their peers for this honor. Join us in celebrating the 2019 class of the Fellows of The Electrochemical Society. Full Story


How to simulate softness

How to simulate softness

August 30, 2019

UC San Diego researchers discovered clever tricks to design materials that replicate different levels of perceived softness. The findings provide fundamental insights into designing tactile materials and haptic interfaces that can recreate realistic touch sensations. Full Story


Darren Lipomi receives NSF grant to develop new materials for haptics and as tools for understanding the sense of touch

Darren Lipomi receives NSF grant to develop new materials for haptics and as tools for understanding the sense of touch

August 20, 2019

Mimicking fine-grained sensations of touch requires materials that can change their mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties in real time. The Lipomi lab will approach this task by developing a system of haptic devices based on materials that can create sensations that can be transformed dynamically--e.g., rough vs. smooth, hot vs. cold, and sticky vs. slimy. Leveraging the flexible, wearable nature of these "haptic biomaterials," the investigators will build a prototype haptic glove that will allow a human user to differentiate between virtual objects by touch. Full Story


Wearable Electrochemical Microneedle Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Levodopa: Toward Parkinson Management

Wearable Electrochemical Microneedle Sensor for Continuous Monitoring of Levodopa: Toward Parkinson Management

August 12, 2019

A new wearable sensor could offer minimally invasive monitoring of the medication levodopa (L-Dopa) for patients with Parkinson's disease. The latest paper from the Laboratory for Nanobioelectronics led by Joseph Wang was published in ACS Sensors. The work could lead to treatments that optimize individual drug dosing and therefore improve disease symptoms. Full Story


Three UC San Diego Engineering Professors Receive Presidential Early Career Awards

Three UC San Diego Engineering Professors Receive Presidential Early Career Awards

July 3, 2019

Three faculty members at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering have been named recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on scientists and engineers in the early stages of their independent research careers. Full Story


Wearable cooling and heating patch could serve as personal thermostat and save energy

Wearable cooling and heating patch could serve as personal thermostat and save energy

May 17, 2019

UC San Diego engineers have developed a wearable patch that could provide personalized cooling and heating at home, work, or on the go. The soft, stretchy patch cools or warms a user’s skin to a comfortable temperature and keeps it there as the ambient temperature changes. It is powered by a flexible, stretchable battery pack and can be embedded in clothing. Researchers say wearing it could help save energy on air conditioning and heating. Full Story


Bioengineers are inducted into renowned biomedical engineering institute

Bioengineers are inducted into renowned biomedical engineering institute

March 25, 2019

Two researchers at Jacobs School of Engineering were inducted into the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), the organization announced. Professors Pedro Cabrales and Todd Coleman from the Department of Bioengineering were recognized during a ceremony at the National Academy of Sciences Great Hall in Washington, DC, on March 25. Full Story


Printed sensors provide on the spot fentanyl detection

Printed sensors provide on the spot fentanyl detection

March 21, 2019

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed screen-printed sensors that could offer a faster, convenient and low-cost method to detect the drug fentanyl. The sensors can detect micromolar concentrations of fentanyl in just one minute. They are easy to produce, cost only a few cents apiece, and are disposable. Full Story


Review in Nature Biotechnology: Wearable biosensors for healthcare monitoring

Review in Nature Biotechnology: Wearable biosensors for healthcare monitoring

February 25, 2019

UC San Diego researchers at the Center for Wearable Sensors published a review article in the journal Nature Biotechnology cataloging state-of-the-art advances in wearable biosensors for healthcare monitoring. The review article also highlights areas where more research is necessary. Full Story


Engineers develop 3D-printed metamaterials that change mechanical properties under magnetic fields

Engineers develop 3D-printed metamaterials that change mechanical properties under magnetic fields

December 8, 2018

A team of researchers have developed an entirely new class of metamaterials that can nearly instantly respond and stiffen 3D printed structures when exposed to a magnetic field, a development that could be applied to next-generation helmets, wearable armor and a host of other innovations. Full Story


Center for Wearable Sensors Fall 2018 Research Summit

Center for Wearable Sensors Fall 2018 Research Summit

November 7, 2018

The Center for Wearable Sensors hosted its Fall 2018 Research Summit on Nov. 7. UC San Diego faculty gave talks on their CWS projects, ranging from wearable ultrasound patches to microelectrodes for monitoring brain activity. Full Story


Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

September 12, 2018

A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure. Applications include real-time, continuous monitoring of blood pressure changes in patients with heart or lung disease, as well as patients who are critically ill or undergoing surgery. The patch uses ultrasound, so it could potentially be used to non-invasively track other vital signs and physiological signals from places deep inside the body. Full Story


'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone

'Building up' stretchable electronics to be as multipurpose as your smartphone

August 13, 2018

By connecting layers of stretchable circuits on top of one another, engineers have developed an approach to build soft “3D stretchable electronics” that can pack more functions while staying thin and small. As a proof of concept, the team built a multifunctional "smart bandage" that can be worn on the skin and used to wirelessly monitor an array of signals, from respiration, to body motion, to brain activity, and even remotely control a robotic arm. Full Story


UC San Diego nanoengineer named among MIT Technology Review's top innovators under 35

UC San Diego nanoengineer named among MIT Technology Review's top innovators under 35

June 29, 2018

MIT Technology Review has named Sheng Xu, a professor of nanoengineering at the University of California San Diego, as one of this year’s top innovators under 35. Xu is being recognized for inventing a clever way to make off-the-shelf electronics stretchable. Full Story


Clinical Trial Tests Tattoo Sensor as Needleless Glucose Monitor for Diabetes Patients

Clinical Trial Tests Tattoo Sensor as Needleless Glucose Monitor for Diabetes Patients

April 19, 2018

A temporary tattoo for glucose monitoring developed by engineers at UC San Diego is being tested in a phase I clinical trial. The study will test the tattoo sensor’s accuracy at detecting glucose levels compared to a traditional glucometer. The clinical trial is enrolling 50 adults, ages 18 to 75, with either type 1 or 2 diabetes or diabetes due to other causes. Full Story


Tiny injectable sensor could provide unobtrusive, long-term alcohol monitoring

Tiny injectable sensor could provide unobtrusive, long-term alcohol monitoring

April 10, 2018

Engineers have developed a tiny, ultra-low power chip that could be injected just under the surface of the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The chip is powered wirelessly by a wearable device such as a smartwatch or patch. The goal of this work is to develop a convenient, routine monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs.  Full Story


Flexible ultrasound patch could make it easier to inspect damage in odd-shaped structures

Flexible ultrasound patch could make it easier to inspect damage in odd-shaped structures

March 23, 2018

Researchers have developed a stretchable, flexible patch that could make it easier to perform ultrasound imaging on odd-shaped structures, such as engine parts, turbines, reactor pipe elbows and railroad tracks—objects that are difficult to examine using conventional ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound patch is a versatile and more convenient tool to inspect machine and building parts for defects and damage deep below the surface. Full Story


A wearable system to monitor the stomach's activity throughout the day

A wearable system to monitor the stomach's activity throughout the day

March 21, 2018

A team of researchers has developed a wearable, non-invasive system to monitor electrical activity in the stomach over 24 hours—essentially an electrocardiogram but for the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract.  Applications include monitoring GI activity for patients outside of a clinical setting, which cuts down costs. Monitoring for longer periods of time also increases the likelihood of capturing abnormal events.  Researchers detail their findings in the March 22 issue of Nature’s open access journal Scientific Reports. Full Story


Engineers develop most efficient red-light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells

Engineers develop most efficient red-light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells

March 12, 2018

A team of researchers has developed a light-activated switch that can turn genes on and off in mammalian cells. This is the most efficient so-called “optogenetic switch” activated by red and far-red light that has been successfully designed and tested in animal cells—and it doesn’t require the addition of light sensing molecules from outside the cells.   Full Story


Nano-ink-based sensors detect an eye blink

Nano-ink-based sensors detect an eye blink

January 31, 2018

Through developing a graphene-nanosheet-based ink, collaborators at the University of California ? San Diego and the National Taiwan University of Science and Technology have produced flexible, wearable, ultrathin sensors. Fabricated by printing multiple layers directly onto medical tape, the printed graphene sensors can be easily affixed to skin. Due to their high strain sensitivity, deformations to the sensor caused by subject movement can allow non-invasive health monitoring. Further, through combining multiple small sensor patches to make different geometries, the sensors accurately follow hand motions and can even monitor eye-blinking and pulse. Full Story


Less than skin deep: humans can feel molecular differences between nearly identical surfaces

Less than skin deep: humans can feel molecular differences between nearly identical surfaces

December 13, 2017

How sensitive is the human sense of touch? Sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has shown. Full Story


Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

Smartphone case offers blood glucose monitoring on the go

December 7, 2017

Engineers at the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors have developed a smartphone case and app that could make it easier for patients to record and track their blood glucose readings, whether they’re at home or on the go. Full Story


A fashionable chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring

A fashionable chemical and biological threat detector-on-a-ring

October 30, 2017

Wearable sensors are revolutionizing the tech-world, capable of tracking processes in the body, such as heart rates. They're even becoming fashionable Full Story


New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease

New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease

September 7, 2017

Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient’s gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive and more accurate than the state of the art. Full Story


Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

August 22, 2017

A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices.  Full Story


Engineers talk VR, AI and nanotechnology at San Diego Comic-Con

Engineers talk VR, AI and nanotechnology at San Diego Comic-Con

July 20, 2017

It’s not every day that engineers get to speak side by side with the people behind hit movies and TV series. But that is exactly what two engineering faculty members are doing this week at Comic-Con in San Diego.  Full Story


Low-cost smart glove converts signs of American Manual Alphabet to text

Low-cost smart glove converts signs of American Manual Alphabet to text

July 12, 2017

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a smart glove that wirelessly converts signs of the American Manual Alphabet into text and controls a virtual hand to mimic sign language gestures. The device, which engineers call “The Language of Glove,” was built for less than $100 using stretchable and printable electronics that are inexpensive, commercially available and easy to assemble. Full Story


'Near-zero-power' temperature sensor could make wearables, smart home devices less power-hungry

'Near-zero-power' temperature sensor could make wearables, smart home devices less power-hungry

June 30, 2017

Electrical engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a temperature sensor that runs on only 113 picowatts of power — 628 times lower power than the state of the art and about 10 billion times smaller than a watt. This "near-zero-power" temperature sensor could extend the battery life of wearable or implantable devices that monitor body temperature, smart home monitoring systems, Internet of Things devices and environmental monitoring systems. Full Story


Printed, flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors

Printed, flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors

May 24, 2017

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics. The work appears in the April 19, 2017 issue of Advanced Energy Materials.    Full Story


UC San Diego Engineer Talks Tech with Congressional Staff in Washington, D.C.

UC San Diego Engineer Talks Tech with Congressional Staff in Washington, D.C.

May 19, 2017

UC San Diego electrical engineering professor Patrick Mercier met with staff members working for representatives for San Diego County and for California Senator Dianne Feinstein at an event on Capitol Hill, where he showcased wearable technologies that have the potential to revolutionize access to health care.  Full Story


A Wearable Sensors Research Center in Beijing Is Named After UC San Diego NanoEngineering Professor Joseph Wang

A Wearable Sensors Research Center in Beijing Is Named After UC San Diego NanoEngineering Professor Joseph Wang

April 20, 2017

A wearable sensors research center at Beijing University of Science and Technology has been named in honor of UC San Diego NanoEngineering professor and chair Joseph Wang, who also serves as Director of the UC San Diego Center for Wearable Sensors. Full Story


'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips

'Lab-on-a-glove' could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer's fingertips

March 23, 2017

Researchers have developed a wearable, flexible biosensor glove that can rapidly detect toxic nerve agents with the touch of a finger. The so-called "lab-on-a-glove" could help improve both defense and food security measures. The team, led by nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego, published their work this month in ACS Sensors. Full Story


New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

March 13, 2017

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro.  Full Story


Engineers develop a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses

Engineers develop a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses

December 13, 2016

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new non-invasive method to detect infections in prostheses used for amputees, as well as for knee, hip and other joint replacements. The method, which is at the proof of concept stage, consists of a simple imaging technique and an innovative material to coat the prostheses.  Full Story


UC San Diego Hosts Wearable Sensors Summit

UC San Diego Hosts Wearable Sensors Summit

November 9, 2016

The Center for Wearable Sensors at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering recently hosted its annual research summit.“The summit was a great opportunity for us to discuss and chart the future of wearable sensors with the forward-looking faculty we have as well as industry who know the field,” said Center co-director and electrical and computer engineering professor Patrick Mercier. Research in the Center features interdisciplinary collaborations to produce innovative technologies in the field of wearable sensors. For example, Center co-director and nanoengineering professor Joseph Wang’s lab have worked with electrical engineers in Mercier’s lab to develop a mouth guard sensor and an alcohol sensor. Full Story


Tackling Changes and Challenges With Robotics

Tackling Changes and Challenges With Robotics

November 3, 2016

 An aging, and sometimes ailing, population. An increasing number of self-driving cars and delivery drones. More complex and automated factories. These are just some of the coming changes discussed at the UC San Diego Contextual Robotics Institute’s third annual forum. The overarching topic, “Shared Autonomy: New Directions in Human-Machine Interaction,” will be important for defining the future of human health and well-being at the level of individuals, communities and societies.       Full Story


Engineers develop new magnetic ink to print self-healing devices that heal in record time

Engineers develop new magnetic ink to print self-healing devices that heal in record time

November 2, 2016

NanoEngineers at UC San Diego have developed a magnetic ink that can be used to make self-healing batteries, electrochemical sensors and wearable, textile-based electrical circuits. The work represents an important step towards widespread practical applications for long-lasting printed electronic devices. Such devices could be integrated into a wide range of health- and environment- monitoring applications and beyond.  Full Story


Five Ph.D. students named Siebel Scholars

Five Ph.D. students named Siebel Scholars

September 27, 2016

Five engineering graduate students from the University of California, San Diego have been named 2017 Siebel Scholars. The Siebel Scholars program recognizes exceptional students at the world’s leading graduate schools of business, computer science, and bioengineering and provides them with a financial award for their final year of studies.  Full Story


UC San Diego Names Computer Engineer to Fratamico Endowed Chair

UC San Diego Names Computer Engineer to Fratamico Endowed Chair

September 20, 2016

Tajana Rosing has been named the John J. and Susan M. Fratamico Endowed Chair in the Jacobs School of Engineering. Her wide-ranging work includes use of drones to detect areas of higher air pollution collaboratively and dynamically, and to provide this feedback in real time in emergencies (e.g., forest fires), and in normal daily life (such as air pollution due to recent fertilization of nearby fields, or due to higher than normal and localized smog conditions). Full Story


'Inside Innovation' Series at UC San Diego Kicks Off with Todd Coleman

'Inside Innovation' Series at UC San Diego Kicks Off with Todd Coleman

September 6, 2016

“Inside Innovation,” a new series of free, public presentations, will feature the latest innovation technologies by UC San Diego, with opportunities for participants to get an inside look at what’s happening in our labs, explore commercialization opportunities, and inquire about licensing. Full Story


UC San Diego, SDSU to Roll Out Research Platform to Improve Hearing-Aid Technologies

UC San Diego, SDSU to Roll Out Research Platform to Improve Hearing-Aid Technologies

August 10, 2016

Engineers from UC San Diego, including Patrick Mercier from the Center for Wearable Sensors, and audiologists from SDSU have set out an ambitious timetable for delivering two new electronic platforms to dramatically improve and accelerate research on better hearing aids. Full Story


Flexible wearable electronic skin patch offers new way to monitor alcohol levels

Flexible wearable electronic skin patch offers new way to monitor alcohol levels

August 2, 2016

Engineers at UC San Diego have developed a flexible wearable sensor that can accurately measure a person’s blood alcohol level from sweat and transmit the data wirelessly to a laptop, smartphone or other mobile device. The device can be worn on the skin and could be used by doctors and police officers for continuous, non-invasive and real-time monitoring of blood alcohol content. Full Story


UC San Diego Inventions Gain $6-Million Venture-Capital Backing

UC San Diego Inventions Gain $6-Million Venture-Capital Backing

July 25, 2016

“MouthSense” and “SmartFoam” are two inventions by UC San Diego engineers that have attracted funding from NextWave Venture Partners. MouthSense is a salivary diagnostic sensor that can be worn in the mouth or used externally for continuous non-invasive real-time monitoring of saliva biomarkers, such as lactate, cortisol and uric acid – a marker related to diabetes and gout. SmartFoam is an intelligent, ultra-compliant composite foam that could be used in wearable biomedical sensors. Full Story


No. 1 From the Start

No. 1 From the Start

May 26, 2016

Bioengineers at the University of California San Diego have helped us understand why atherosclerosis develops and how it is impacted by blood flow. They have pioneered the development of very thin, small and flexible sensors that stick to the skin and monitor vital signs, such as the brain activity of a newborn. They also developed injectable hydrogels that can help muscle tissues heal after a heart attack. Researchers celebrated their achievements over the past five decades and looked to the future during a three-day 50th anniversary celebration May 19 to 21. Full Story


Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricorder-like device

Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricorder-like device

May 23, 2016

Engineers at UC San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. The Chem-Phys patch records electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals and tracks levels of lactate, a biochemical that is a marker of physical effort, in real time. The device can be worn on the chest and communicates wirelessly with a smartphone, smart watch or laptop.  Full Story


The frontier of wearable sensors discussed at summit

The frontier of wearable sensors discussed at summit

April 28, 2016

Scores of industry leaders and researchers turned out to participate in the Jacobs School's wearable sensors summit run by its Center for Wearable Sensors. Full Story


Lipomi Lab is Stretching the Limits of Wearable Devices

Lipomi Lab is Stretching the Limits of Wearable Devices

April 7, 2016

UC San Diego NanoEngineering professor Darren Lipomi is stretching the limits of wearable devices for a wide range of health- and wellness- monitoring applications and beyond. Lipomi is a key member of both the Center for Wearable Sensors and the Sustainable Power and Energy Center. Full Story


Health Data Exploration Projects Show Value of Personal Health Data and Devices

Health Data Exploration Projects Show Value of Personal Health Data and Devices

March 31, 2016

A series of reports from recipients of five Health Data Exploration (HDE) grants demonstrate a growing awareness and appreciation for systems and devices that monitor personal health data, advance the use of personal health data for research and encourage healthy living. Full Story


Jacobs School Researchers Cited Among 'World's Most Influential Scientific Minds'

Jacobs School Researchers Cited Among 'World's Most Influential Scientific Minds'

February 1, 2016

Four researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego were included on the 2015 listing of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds,” an annual compendium of “Highly Cited Researchers” by Thomson Reuters, a multinational mass media and information company. Full Story


Brain monitoring takes a leap out of the lab

Brain monitoring takes a leap out of the lab

January 12, 2016

Bioengineers and cognitive scientists have developed the first portable, 64-channel wearable brain activity monitoring system that’s comparable to state-of-the-art equipment found in research laboratories. The researchers are working toward a world where neuroimaging systems work with mobile sensors and smart phones to track brain states throughout the day and augment the brain’s capabilities. Full Story


Mobile Health, the at-home clinic

Mobile Health, the at-home clinic

November 25, 2015

Engineers at UC San Diego aim to leverage technology that already exists within the wireless ecosystem to deepen the remote doctor-patient interaction. “How can we make a mobile phone the first line of defense in our healthcare?” asked Drew Hall, an electrical engineering professor at the Jacobs School,  Full Story


Bioengineering professor featured in Top 100 list on African-American influential site

Bioengineering professor featured in Top 100 list on African-American influential site

November 17, 2015

Bioengineer Todd Coleman, from the University of California, San Diego, has been named one of 100 outstanding individuals for 2015 by The Root, a premier news, opinion and culture site for African-American influencers. Coleman will present his research at the prestigious TEDMED conference Nov. 18 to 20 in Palm Springs.  Full Story


UC San Diego Launches Robotics Institute

UC San Diego Launches Robotics Institute

October 29, 2015

The Jacobs School of Engineering and Division of Social Sciences at UC San Diego have launched the Contextual Robotics Institute to develop safe and useful robotics systems. These robotics systems will function in the real world based on the contextual information they perceive, in real time. Elder care and assisted living, disaster response, medicine, transportation and environmental sensing are just some of the helpful applications that will emerge from tomorrow’s human-friendly robots.The Contextual Robotics Institute will leverage UC San Diego’s research strengths in engineering, computer science and cognitive science and work collaboratively across the campus and the region to establish San Diego as a leader in the research, development and production of human-friendly robotics systems. Full Story


Bioengineers cut in half time needed to make high-tech flexible sensors

Bioengineers cut in half time needed to make high-tech flexible sensors

October 27, 2015

Bioengineers at UC San Diego have developed a method that cuts down by half the time needed to make high-tech flexible sensors for medical applications. The advance brings the sensors, which can be used to monitor vital signs and brain activity, one step closer to mass-market manufacturing. The new fabrication process will allow bioengineers to broaden the reach of their research to more clinical settings. It also makes it possible to manufacture the sensors with a process similar to the printing press, said Todd Coleman, the bioengineering professor at the Jacobs School leading the project.  Full Story


With this new universal wireless charger, compatibility won't be an issue

With this new universal wireless charger, compatibility won't be an issue

October 13, 2015

A wireless charger that’s compatible with different consumer electronics from different brands is one step closer to becoming a reality thanks to research by electrical engineers at the University of California, San Diego. Researchers have developed a dual frequency wireless charging platform that could be used to charge multiple devices, such as smartphones, smartwatches, laptops and tablets, at the same time — regardless of which wireless standard, or frequency, each device supports.  Full Story


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